Key Note Speakers

Deborah Cameron

Deborah Cameron

Professor of Language and Communication at Oxford University in the UK,

where she teaches sociolinguistics, English Language and Women's Studies. She's also a regular blogger, a media commentator on linguistic issues, and an occasional stand-up comedian. 

Conal Condren

Conal Condren

Honorary Professor Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities; Emeritus Scientia Professor University of New South Wales

He works both as a political philosopher and intellectual historian. Chronologically his work has ranged from the 14th to the 18th centuries and within this period he has concentrated mainly on persons and problems seen as raising broader issues. He has developed his own approach to the nature and study of intellectual history requiring the integration of materials beyond the boundaries of “politics” or “theory” and the layering of different types of context. His work has continuity of theme and places emphasis on pragmatics (word use and change) and historical interpretation. He has also published in non-historical areas of political theory/philosophy: one major work was largely taken up with the logical analysis of interpretative concepts. 

Don Kulick

Don Kulick

Distinguished University Professor of Anthropology at Uppsala University and director of the Engaging Vulnerability research program.

He has published on language socialization, language death, language and sexuality, indigenous forms of Christianity, sex work and prostitution, humour, reflexive epistemology, fat studies, disability studies and animal studies. His most recent books are A Death in the Rainforest: how a language and a way of life came to an end in Papua New Guinea (Algonquin Books, 2019) and A Grammar and Dictionary of Tayap: the life and death of a Papuan language (with Angela Terill, De Gruyter, 2019).

Martin Rowson

Martin Rowson

A multi-award winning cartoonist, illustrator and writer.

His work has appeared regularly in The Guardian, Daily Mirror, Spectator, New Statesman, The Times and many other publications for over 30 years. His books include a memoir, “Stuff”, which was longlisted for the 2007 Samuel Johnson Prize, and graphic novelisations of The Waste Land, Tristram Shandy & Gulliver’s Travels. He in currently working on a comic book version of The Communist Manifesto. As well as being chair of the British Cartoonists’ Association, he is also currently a vice-president of the Zoological Society of London. He lives with his wife in south-east London. Photo by Emyr Young

Tony Veale

Tony Veale

An associate professor at UCD, University College Dublin, where his principal research interest is Computational Creativity (CC), specifically focusing on irony, humour, metaphor, simile, blending and analogy.

(Afflatus.UCD.ie) He has been a visiting professor at Fudan University, Shanghai for 13 years, as part of the international BSc. in Software Engineering which he helped establish in 2002, and at KAIST, the Korean Advanced Institute of Science & Technology, as a visiting professor in Web Science. Veale led the European coordination action on Computational Creativity, PROSECCO (Promoting the Scientific Exploration of Computational Creativity) which worked to develop the field of CC into a mature discipline. He is the author of the 2012 book Exploding the Creativity Myth: The Computational Foundations of Linguistic Creativity from Bloomsbury, co-author of the 2016 textbook Metaphor: A Computational Perspective from Morgan Claypool, co-author of the 2018 book Twitterbots: Making Machines That Make Meaning from MIT Press, and co-editor of several collected volumes of research. He is chair of the international Association for Computational Creativity (ACC), and launched the site RobotComix.com to make CC more accessible to the public.